Home Programs Prospective Students Curriculum Admissions Financial Information Current Students Faculty Contact

Course Descriptions

BIO 101-102: Principles of Biology I & II

Course Description An introductory two-course sequence that presents the basic principles and processes of biological science. Principles of Biology I includes the structure and function of the cell, cellular metabolism, cell reproduction, plant physiology, genetics and molecular biology. Principles of Biology II includes viral genetics, endocrinology, immunology, animal development, and the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, reproductive and nervous systems. Laboratory exercises include microscopy, cellular reproduction, enzyme activity, DNA analysis, transformation, comparative studies of animal and plant cells, and vertebrates.
Prerequisites None
Credits 4



BIO 211: Genetics

Course Description Basic laws of heredity and their physical basis (classical genetics); structure and function of the gene (molecular genetics); and population genetics with some attention to human genetic abnormalities. The laboratory work familiarizes the student with basic techniques in genetic research including making crosses, analysis of data, recombinant DNA technology and problem-solving. (Lecture and laboratory course).
Prerequisites BIO 101-102.
Credits 4



BIO 222-223: Anatomy and Physiology I & II

Course Description A two-course sequence which studies the structure and function of cells, tissues, organs and systems of the body. Emphasis is on the structural basis for function, and the coordinated functioning of all the organ systems for maintaining homeostasis. Recommended for students pursuing careers in allied health fields. (Lecture and laboratory course).
Prerequisites BIO 101-102.
Credits 4



BIO 228: Microbiology

Course Description This course covers the structure, reproduction, physiology, biochemistry, genetics and identification of microorganisms. It includes a study of their relationship to each other and to other living organisms, their distribution in nature, and their beneficial and disease causing effects on humans. (lecture and laboratory course).
Prerequisites BIO 101-102.
Credits 4



BIO 302: Immunology

Course Description The nature of the immune system and different aspects of natural defense systems are classified. Structural analogies between hematopoietic and lymphopoietic tissues are defined. The interrelationships between humoral, cell-mediated, and complement-mediated immunity are covered in-depth with particular attention to the regulation of the immune response by cell-cell interactions. The mechanisms, mediation, and control of allergic reactions by immunomodulatory agents is discussed. Current concepts of autoimmunity are covered and the mechanisms and consequences of immunodeficiency and immunoproliferative disorders are discussed as well.
Prerequisites BIO 101-102, CPC 201-202
Credits 3



BIO 304: Endocrinology

Course Description This course is designed to study the interactive physiology of mammals, with emphasis on the human organism, as regulated by the endocrine system. It will cover the following areas: (1) cellular endocrinology, including hormone-receptor interactions, second messenger systems, and hormone synthesis; (2) systemic endocrinology, including regulation of body metabolism and homeostasis, and reproductive endocrinology; (3) new trends in molecular endocrinology; (4) disease states due to endocrine malfunction.
Prerequisites BIO 101-102.
Credits 3



BIO 311: Human Genetics

Course Description Basic principles of human genetics, stressing human chromosome groups, clinical genetics, biochemical genetics, pharmacogenetics, somatic cell genetics, immunogenetics, and population genetics. The laboratory experiments include techniques used in both clinical and research genetics.
Prerequisites BIO 101-102
Credits 3



BIO 313 : Topics in Biochemistry

Course Description A study of the chemistry of biomolecules, metabolic pathways and mechanisms of control that contribute to homeostasis and survival at the cellular , tissue ,organ, organ system and whole body levels. Although structured as a one semester course, all aspects of a two semester lecture course in biochemistry are covered in detail. These topics include a description of the classes of biomolecules, functions of enzymes, major metabolic pathways, respiration and photosynthesis, and important aspects of molecular biology. This course counts as an elective towards a major in Biology. It also fulfills the new American Chemical Society Committee on Professional training Guidelines
Prerequisites BIO. 102, Chem. 102.
Credits 3



BIO 318: Cellular and Molecular Biology

Course Description The main focus of this course is regulation of gene expression. It integrates advanced biotechnology, cell biology and genetics. The laboratory consists of experiments designed to support concepts presented in lecture.
Prerequisites BIO 101-102.
Credits 4



BIO 321: Parasitology

Course Description This course is an introduction to the biochemistry, physiology, life cycles, classification, anatomy and ecology of parasites.
Prerequisites BIO 101-102.
Credits 4



BIO 322: Seminar in Selected Topics in Cell Biology (upon request)

Course Description Recent advances in cell and molecular biology and in mechanisms of differentiation of tissues are dealt with utilizing lectures, discussion, and student reports. Topics covered vary each year depending on recent significant advances and on student interest.
Prerequisites BIO 101-102 and CPC 201-202.
Credits 2



BIO 349: Nutrition

Course Description Nutritional science integrates many disciplines including, but not limited to, food science, anatomy and physiology, medicine, biochemistry, and psychology. An intensive study of functions, digestion/absorption, interrelationships, and cellular metabolism of the six classes of nutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals, and water) will be presented. Nutritional requirements throughout the life cycle, meal planning essentials, and evaluation of diets for adequacy will be addressed. Acute and chronic diseases, having poor nutrition as a major risk factor for their development, will be discussed. Nutritional self-assessment will be incorporated through anthropometric studies and dietary analysis.
Prerequisites BIO 101-102; CPC 101-102. Recommended prerequisites: BIO 222- 223
Credits 3



BIO 481-482: Independent Study

Course Description
Prerequisites None
Credits Credits by arrangement



BIO 493: Research Topics in Biology

Course Description
Prerequisites Senior status
Credits 3



BIO 494: Senior Honors Project in Biology (upon request)

Course Description
Prerequisites BIO 493 and departmental permission.
Credits 3



COC 101: Fundamentals of Speech

Course Description Techniques of public speaking. Includes the delivery of several speeches during the course of the program.
Prerequisites None
Credits 3



CPC 101-102: Principles of Inorganic Chemistry I & II

Course Description Topics covered include nomenclature, stoichiometric relationships, atomic structure, bonding and states of matter. In addition, topics treated include chemical equilibria, free energy and entropy, acid-base reactions, oxidation reduction, electro-chemistry, complex ions, reaction rates, radioactivity, and elementary concepts of organic chemistry. Laboratory work entails experiments illustrating the principles taught in lecture and qualitative analysis.
Prerequisites for CPC 102: MAT 120.
Credits 4



CPC 201-202: Principles of Organic Chemistry I and II

Course Description Subjects covered include reactions, syn-thetic procedures, and methods for differ-entiation and identification. Mechanisms of reactions, stereochemistry, and spec-troscopy are emphasized. Details of the characteristics of aliphatic and aromatic compounds with different functional groups are stressed. Laboratory work with the methodology involved in synthetic and analytic procedures. (Lecture and laboratory course).
Prerequisites CPC101 & 102.
Credits 4



CPC 203: Biological Chemistry

Course Description A one-semester introductory course for students preparing for professions in allied health sciences such as nutrition, physical and occupational therapy, and physician assistant. Topics include enzyme chemistry, function and structure of macromolecules, metabolism and synthesis of proteins, and molecular biology. This course will not count toward a major in biology, chemistry, or the interdisciplinary science degree.
Prerequisites CPC 101 -102.
Credits 3



CPP 101-102: General Physics I & II

Course Description This two-sequence course, designed for the non-physics major, covers classical mechanics; heat, electricity, magnet-ism, light and sound phenomena. The approach is generally quantitative, but does not require calculus. Laboratory experiments illustrate and test the fundamental laws and the reliability of results.
Prerequisites MAT 120.
Credits 4



EBE 101: Principles of Macroeconomics

Course Description Theoretical models of the economy as a whole show what determines the level of national output, employment, and prices, and how these might be stabilized by the proper fiscal and monetary policies. The course also looks at the mechanisms by which our money supply changes, and considers the benefits and problems associated with international trade. Topics covered include the measurement of GNP, inflation and unemployment; Keynesian and classical theories of output and price determination; expenditures and money multipliers; the Federal Reserve System; the federal budget and the national debt; and the balance of payments.
Prerequisites None
Credits 3



EBM 100: Introduction to American Business

Course Description A survey of American business. The student is given an overview of business formations, management origins, and the functional relationships of marketing, finance, personnel, systems analysis and production of the organization and its environment.
Prerequisites None
Credits 3



EBM 101: Principles of Management

Course Description An introduction to the basic theory and practice of management. Examination of the managerial functions of planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling, and analysis of environmental influences on decision-making. Students will use micro-computer programs for business applications.
Prerequisites EBE 101
Credits 3



GHS 202: Civilizations of the Ancient World

Course Description The history and philosophy of the ancient world from the beginning of recorded time through the rise of Christianity. The civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome are investigated.
Prerequisites None
Credits 3



GHS 203: The Immigrant Experience in America

Course Description This course examines the unique immigrant experience of various ethnic groups. Students learn about conditions in foreign countries that gave impetus to emigration, difficulties in adjustment and acculturation, specific areas of achievement, attempts to preserve ethnic identity within the American mainstream, and contemporary issues and problems.
Prerequisites None
Credits 3



GHU 141 : Introduction to Human Services

Course Description A survey of public and private human service programs with special emphasis on current human services available in the city and state. Skills, knowledge, attitudes and values for human service work are examined, as are the methods of intervention and counseling theories available to the human service worker
Prerequisites None
Credits 4



GHU 326: Case Management I in Human Services

Course Description This course explores the recent development of the innovative functions of case management in human services. It further examines the case manager's role and its importance to effective client services. Issues of assessing clients' needs, brokering for client services and monitoring the quality of services will be discussed.
Prerequisites GHU 141
Credits 3



GSM 001: Developmental Math

Course Description Review of basic arithmetic skills. Topics include whole numbers, order of operations, rounding and factoring, fractions, mixed numbers and decimals. Also a review of basic algebraic skills. Topics include substitution and evaluation, linear equations, ratios and proportions, percents, word problems and signed numbers. Required of all students who do not pass the placement test or have appropriate transfer credit for mathematics. May be repeated.
Prerequisites placement by examination.
Credits 0



HIA 200: Medical Terminology

Course Description A study of the technical language of medicine through word construction utilizing roots, prefixes, suffixes and combining forms. This course includes accepted usage of anatomical, physiological, disease, therapeutic and procedural terms related to the delivery of health care.
Prerequisites None
Credits 3



HIS 141-142: The Emergence of the United States I & II

Course Description The interplay of the political and social forces in America from the Colonial Period to the 1990's with special attention given to the rise of political parties, the development of sectionalism, the causes and results of the Civil War, industrial growth, Progressivism, the New Deal, and the Cold War. HIS 141 concludes with the end of Reconstruction (1877).
Prerequisites None
Credits 3



HIS 220-221: Survey of Modern History I & II

Course Description A two-course survey of modern European and world history. HIS 220 covers the Renaissance through Reformation and Scientific revolution until the downfall of Napoleon. HIS 221 begins with political and intellectual currents in the nineteenth century, focuses on the two world wars, and concludes with the contemporary world scene.
Prerequisites None
Credits 3



HIS 262: The Holocaust

Course Description The role of Nazism in the destruction of European Jewry, 1933 - 1945, is studied, with special attention given to the reactions of world Jewry and foreign governments to the catastrophe. Ghetto and concentration camp existence, as well as, Jewish resistance movements are also analyzed.
Prerequisites HIS 156 or permission of the instructor.
Credits 3



HIS 450: American Cultural History

Course Description The evolution and development of American culture from colonial times to the present. Topics include Puritanism and its effect on American life and literature, the American Revolution and the spirit of individualism in American life, the Civil War, African-American literature, theater, film, music and art.
Prerequisites None
Credits 3



HS 500: Introduction to Emergency Management

Course Description This course includes an introduction to the Incident Command System (ICS) as it applies to the health care/hospital, business and emergency responder environment. Also provides the foundation for higher level ICS training. Describes the history, features and principles, and organizational structure of the Incident Command System. It also explains the relationship between ICS and the National Incident Management System (NIMS).
Prerequisites None
Credits 3



HSB 101: The U.S. Health Care System

Course Description This course introduces students to the many facets of the U.S. health care system, including how it is financed, managed and delivered. There will be a strong emphasis on class discussion, using students' personal experiences as a vehicle for exploring the details, the issues and the controversies. At the end of the class, students will gain skills in critical reading and thinking about the health care system.
Prerequisites None
Credits 3



HSB 201: Introduction to Health Service Facilities

Course Description This course will provide an overview of health care facilities in the United States. Students will examine the roles and responsibilities of the personnel that work in those institutions, and how they are organized to make decisions, assure quality and solve problems. Students will visit different health care facilities and observe personnel at work. Classes will be interactive, with student participation driving much of the discussion. Classes will also focus on the exploration of case studies.
Prerequisites HSB 101
Credits 3



HSB 211: Human Resources I

Course Description This is an introduction to the study of the Human Resource Department and its function in various health care facilities. Personnel and their essential functions in each type of facility will be presented. Regulatory agency requirements and compliance issues also will be covered.
Prerequisites HSB 101
Credits 3



HSB 212: Human Resources II

Course Description Continuation of HSB 211, with a more in-depth look at specific Human Resource positions in various facilities as well as communication and motivational techniques used in organizational settings.
Prerequisites HSB 211
Credits 3



HSB 251: Patient Services I

Course Description An overview of patient services provided by various facilities will be given. Roles of personnel involved with each service will be reviewed along with the function, purpose and outcome of each service. Access issues regarding each service will be covered.
Prerequisites HSB 101
Credits 3



HSB 252: Patient Services II

Course Description This course describes what the patient and family need to know in order to negotiate the current health care delivery system. Available services as well as rights and process of care will be discussed.
Prerequisites HSB 251
Credits 3



HSB 260: Research Methods

Course Description Students will gain knowledge and skill in research methodology, experimental design, statistical analysis, and critical evaluation of health science literature. Students will develop the skills to formulate research questions, evaluate research protocols, hypotheses, study designs, and discuss their comparative strengths and limitations. Students will gain the knowledge and skills to effectively use and analyze bio-statistics in different research design and data analysis, to conduct computerized searches, and to understand, review and critically analyze professional journal articles. Topics include choosing correct statistical methods and study designs in research and practice, descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing. Ethical issues in research will be discussed, including informed consent and the function of an Institutional Review Board (IRB).
Prerequisites HSB 101
Credits 3



HSB 301: Finance and Marketing in Health Care

Course Description This course presents the fundamentals of accounting according to generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). The coursework will be concrete, with extensive use of workbooks and specific case studies and problems as related to the health care industry.
Prerequisites HSB 101
Credits 3



HSB 302: Advanced Finance in Health Care

Course Description This course briefly reviews HSB 301 and then delves into the specific financial workings of health care facilities and the interpretation of financial reports for further planning and budgeting. A link will be made with data processing and health information management. Financial reports of real institutions will be used whenever practical.
Prerequisites HSB 301
Credits 3



HSB 310: Staffing of Personnel and Scheduling

Course Description An overview of various health care facilities and their personnel and scheduling requirements. The reasoning for the personnel requirements for the various facilities is reviewed. Comparisons of the needs of the different facilities will be discussed. Software packages for personnel scheduling will be studied.
Prerequisites HSB 101, HSB 211
Credits 3



HSB 312: Governmental Regulations

Course Description Presentation of all regulatory agencies governing health care facilities will be given. Structure, power and jurisdiction will be emphasized. Agendas of each agency will be reviewed and compared. History and changes in health care regulation will be discussed.
Prerequisites HSB 101
Credits 3



HSB 320: Medicare and Medicaid

Course Description Guidelines for Medicare and Medicaid will be studied in detail. Differences and similarities will be discussed. Eligibility, financial rewards, hardships and compliance are issues that will be presented, in addition to descriptions of services that are covered.
Prerequisites HSB 101
Credits 3



HSB 322: Case Management and Insurance

Course Description This course covers the definitions and functions of case management, its relationship to the insurance companies, the patient, physicians and facilities. It will also discuss the effects of case management on the quality and quantity of health care in the United States.
Prerequisites HSB 320
Credits 3



HSB 341: Health Information Systems I

Course Description An overview of data processing is presented. This course emphasizes hardware systems but also considers some general software programs. General computer terms and functions will be explained. Students will acquire hands-on experience in computer operation. Mainframe and desktop exposure will be included. Networks will be reviewed. Systems of health information management will be discussed in terms of data acquisition, storage and retrieval. Internet access will be reviewed.
Prerequisites HSB 101, MCO 140
Credits 3



HSB 342: Health Information Systems II

Course Description This course reviews HSB 341 and presents the data processing needs of health care facilities. It will also discuss those software programs currently on the market that are specifically designed for health care facilities. Each program will be reviewed and compared to the needs of various health care facilities.
Prerequisites HSB 341
Credits 3



HSB 347: Legal Issues in Health Care

Course Description This is a law survey course. From health care insurance and patient rights, to public health preparedness and workplace safety, students will explore the institutions, mechanisms and controversies that comprise the legal aspects of the U.S. health care system.
Prerequisites HSB 101
Credits 3



LLC 101: Elementary Mandarin Chinese I

Course Description This is an introductory Mandarin Chinese course (Putong Hua or Guo Yu) for non-native Chinese speakers. While the approach is aural-lingual, reading and writing skills are introduced in this program. This one semester course covers 700 Chinese characters, grammatical analysis and pattern drills, and stresses conversational practice. LLC 101 aims to develop elementary communicative skills and foster knowledge of the Chinese language and culture in students taking the course.
Prerequisites None
Credits 4



LLE 100: Introduction to English Composition

Course Description Intensive practice in the composition of three paragraph essays, with special emphasis on writing in response to selected readings. (Placement by departmental examination)
Prerequisites None
Credits 3



LLE 101-102: English Composition I & II

Course Description Extensive practice in the composition of clear, concise, and grammatically correct sentences and paragraphs with special emphasis on the five paragraph essay and the research paper (admission by assignment following placement test.)
Prerequisites None
Credits 3



LLE 220-221: Survey of Modern Literature I & II

Course Description A two-course survey of modern literature from the classical through the modern eras. LLE 220 readings include: Sophocles, Beowulf, The Song of Roland, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Cervantes, and Moliere. LLE 221 readings include: the Romantic Poets, Ibsen, Dostoyevsky, Chekhov, Tolstoy, Kafka, Melville, Faulkner, Beckett, Camus and Sartre. Not to be taken after HML 101, HML 102, HML 201, HML 202, LLE 115, LLE 116, LLE 223 or LLE 224.
Prerequisites LLE 102 or exemption.
Credits 3



LLE 371: American Literature Before 1900

Course Description Representative works from the colonial period to the end of the 19th century, with concentration on such later writers as Poe, Melville, Hawthorne, and Twain.
Prerequisites HML 201 or permission of the instructor.
Credits 3



LLE 372: The Modern American Novel

Course Description Major twentieth-century novelists, with emphasis on James, Dreiser, Hemingway, Fitzgerald and Faulkner.
Prerequisites HML 201 or permission of the instructor.
Credits 3



LLS 101-102: Elementary Spanish I, II

Course Description The essentials of Spanish syntax, vocabulary, and pronunciation.
Prerequisites None
Credits 3



MAT 111: College Mathematics

Course Description An introductory course in mathematical skills and techniques necessary for further collegiate study. This course addresses fundamental principles of algebraic calculations such as operations with signed numbers, exponents, negative exponents and operations with fractions, verbal problems and solution of equations, graphical methods and systems of linear equations.
Prerequisites Placement by departmental examination.
Credits 3



MAT 120: Pre-Calculus

Course Description Functions, solution of equations and systems of equations, the trigonometric functions and their graphs, addition theorems and identities, logarithmic and exponential functions, and elementary analytic geometry.
Prerequisites MAT 111 or exemption.
Credits 3



MAT 121-122: Calculus I, II

Course Description Continuity, limits, differentiation and integration of polynomial, exponential and trigonometric functions are discussed. Applications are made in fields of geometry, physics and other areas.
Prerequisites MAT 120
Credits 4



MAT 261: Statistics for Social Science Majors

Course Description Basic concepts in descriptive and inferential statistics including measurement scales, frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and distribution, correlation coefficients, linear regression, probability theory, binomial distribution, and parametric and non parametric tests of significant differences and other topics.
Prerequisites MAT 111 or examination.
Credits 3



MCO 140: Computer Concepts with Microcomputer Applications

Course Description This course introduces students to basic computer topics and terminology. Computer hardware and software are discussed along with personal computer (PC) applications. Office applications are taught as well. Students will complete this course with a solid understanding of computers, how to use computers, and how to access information on the World Wide Web. This course is not a required course or approved elective for a Computer Science or MIS degree.
Prerequisites None
Credits 3



PHI 101: Introduction to Philosophy

Course Description Classical and contemporary writings in such areas as ethics, epistemology, metaphysics, political and social philosophy, philosophy of science, and aesthetics. Emphasis on techniques of critical analysis.
Prerequisites None
Credits 3



PHI 233: Biomedical Ethics

Course Description An examination of ethical issues that arise in the context of medicine. The relevance of ethical theory to such issues as abortion, euthanasia, the allocation of medical resources and research on patients is discussed.
Prerequisites None
Credits 3



POL 101: American Politics

Course Description This course studies (i) the current state of American politics, including the leading issues of the day, (ii) the historical and constitutional foundations of the national government, and (iii) the major institutions of the federal government, including Congress, the presidency and the judiciary. In-depth analysis of the Congress probes policymaking and organization of Congress and it evaluates the performance and functioning of Congress as a representative institution. Additional segments of the course deal with public opinion, the media and the American political economy.
Prerequisites None
Credits 3



POL 103: International Relations

Course Description How nations and transnational actors interact in the international arena and why they behave the way they do with reference to power, balance of power, deterrence, imperialism, diplomacy and negotiations, international law, international organization, collective security, war and the interrelationship between international economic issues and international politics.
Prerequisites None
Credits 3



POL 201: Introduction to Political Theory

Course Description A survey of political theory from Aristotle to the present. The development of political ideas and the writings of major political theorists in their historical and institutional contexts.
Prerequisites None
Credits 3



PSY 101: Introduction to Psychology

Course Description Psychology as a biological, behavioral, and social science. Topics include: critical and scientific analysis of human behavior, fundamentals of psychological research, biological bases of behavior, states of consciousness, learning, thought, memory and intelligence, social behavior and personality, mental health and adjustment, diagnosis and treatment of abnormal behavior.
Prerequisites None
Credits 3



PSY 102: Social Psychology

Course Description Social influences on values, attitudes, and behavior. Determinants of social perceptions and cognition. Bases for friendship, love, prejudice and anti-social behavior. Group dynamics involved in conformity, conflict and cooperation.
Prerequisites or co-requisite: PSY 101.
Credits 3



PSY 201: Developmental Psychology

Course Description Stages of life: infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age, mental, emotional and personality changes during development, and the physiological hurdles overcome.
Prerequisites PSY 101.
Credits 3



PSY 205: The Psychology of Motivation

Course Description Motivation for human behavior from the basic psychological drives to higher drives such as achievement, self-fulfillment and altruism. Emphasis on contemporary research as well as classical theories.
Prerequisites PSY 101
Credits 3



PSY 210: Learning

Course Description Models of animal and human learning including classical and operant conditioning, as well as contemporary theories drawn from information processing and cognitive science. Applications to education, social and clinical psychology.
Prerequisites PSY 101
Credits 3



PSY 221: Industrial Psychology

Course Description Psychological techniques for selecting and training employees, enhancing morale of workers and improving their relationship with management. Psychology of marketing and advertising.
Prerequisites PSY 101
Credits 3



PSY 225: Psychology of Aging

Course Description Physical, cognitive, sensory and personality changes that occur due to aging. Topics include theoretical perspectives, lifestyle changes, family relationships, age-related diseases, health care, as well as death and dying.
Prerequisites PSY 101
Credits 3



PSY 231: Psychological Testing

Course Description Theoretical and statistical foundations of psychological testing. Measurement of intelligence, aptitudes, academic skills, personality, and behavior. Includes formal and informal tests and rating scales.
Prerequisites PSY 101
Credits 3



PSY 301: Experimental Psychology

Course Description Methodological and experimental approaches to human behavior focusing on sensation, perception, learning and memory. Experiments conducted in class, results analyzed and scientific reports written. Students also design and write a proposal for an experimental project.
Prerequisites PSY 101 and MAT 261.
Credits 3



PSY 301.6: Experimental Psychology Lab

Course Description
Prerequisites None
Credits 1



PSY 302 : Advanced Experimental Psychology

Course Description More advanced research design and experimental approaches to human behavior including learning, perception, and problem solving. Scientific reports including possible honors thesis proposal prepared by students.
Prerequisites PSY 301
Credits 3



PSY 310 : Personality

Course Description Description and assessment of personality. Classical approaches of psychoanalysis tract theory, humanism, behaviorism and cognitive theorists as well as contemporary research and practical applications
Prerequisites PSY 101
Credits 3



PSY 311 : Psycholinguistics

Course Description Psychology of language and the higher mental processes. Modern conceptions of syntactic, semantic, and lexical structure of language.
Prerequisites PSY 101
Credits 3



PSY 312 : Cognition and Memory

Course Description Overview of approaches to thinking, reasoning, problem solving, and decision making. Memory theories and process and neurological underpinnings. Interplay of memory and cognition.
Prerequisites PSY 101
Credits 3



PSY 313: Language/Speech Development

Course Description This course examines acquisition of communicative behavior in normal children during the first decade of life; development of syntax, semantics, pragmatics, cognition; clinical laboratory experience with young children.
Prerequisites
Credits 3



PSY 325: Drugs and Behavior

Course Description Behavioral effects of biochemical mechanisms of psychoactive drugs, including prescription, recreational, and illegal drugs. Topics include psychopharmacological treatment of abnormal behaviors and moods, addiction and tolerance, and the treatment of addictions.
Prerequisites PSY 101.
Credits 3



PSY 332: History and Systems of Psychology

Course Description The origin of modern psychology within philosophy during the 19th century. Founding and growth of experimental psychology in Germany and its spread to the United States. Developments in psychoanalysis, Gestalt psychology, humanistic psychology, behaviorism, and new trends.
Prerequisites PYS 101
Credits 3



PSY 335: Abnormal Psychology

Course Description Description and diagnosis of abnormal behavior. Causes, symptoms and treatments of mental illness. Basic principles of psychotherapy.
Prerequisites PSY 101.
Credits 3



PSY 340: Introduction to Counseling and Therapy

Course Description Theories and techniques of counseling. Course includes practice in interviewing and development of basic skills necessary for successful treatment.
Prerequisites PSY 101, PSY 335. Strongly recommended: PSY 310
Credits 3



PSY 345: Psychology of Health and Illness

Course Description This course will examine psychological influences on how people stay healthy, why they become Ill, and how they respond when they are ill. Topics include the mind-body relationship, stress and stress management, chronic pain, headaches, biofeedback and the patient in various treatment settings. The course also examines changes in lifestyle and psychological issues faced by individuals dealing with stroke, arthritis, diabetes, heart disease, cancer and AIDS.
Prerequisites PSY 101.
Credits 3



PSY 351: Biological Psychology

Course Description The biological bases of behavior and methods of study. Topics include: anatomy and physiology of the nervous system and sense organs, drugs and behavior, sleep and dreaming, eating and drinking, memory and language, brain disorders and abnormal behavior.
Prerequisites BIO 101 or PSY 101.
Credits 3



PSY 401: Psychology of the Exceptional Child

Course Description Special problems of children who differ markedly from the average: mentally retarded, brain damaged, psychologically disturbed, sociopathic, physically handicapped, culturally deprived, and gifted children. Genetics, neurophysiological, and sociological aspects as well as causes, assessment, and remediation.
Prerequisites PSY 101 (PSY 335 strongly recommended)
Credits 3



PSY 402 : Clinical Psychology

Course Description Overview of clinical psychology as both an art and a science. Roles of the clinical psychologist and the scientific foundation of assessment and treatment.
Prerequisites PSY 340 or Departmental permission
Credits 3



PSY 420 : Psychology of Eating Disorders

Course Description The etiology, description, and treatment of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder associated with obesity. Relation between eating disorders and other psychopathology.
Prerequisites PSY 335
Credits 3



PSY 432: Neuropsychology

Course Description Cognitive function in the normal and brain-injured adult. Methods of neuropsychological assessment in clinical and research situations. Topics include consciousness, body sense, spatial understanding, language encoding, attention, memory, perceptual processing including vision, and personality. Strategies for remediation.
Prerequisites PSY 351
Credits 3



PSY 481-482: Independent Study (Upon Request)

Course Description Directed study in subject matter not offered in a standard course or independent research study of a new topic. Prerequisite: Junior or higher status with appropriate Psychology GPA and departmental permission.
Prerequisites None
Credits 3



PSY 485: Internship in Psychology (Upon Request)

Course Description Opportunity to work as an intern in an approved organization such as a clinic, school or hospital. The customary requirement is to work 1 day per week, keep a log of daily activity, read relevant texts and journal articles, and write a brief paper linking observations to the literature. Coordinated by a site supervisor and Touro faculty member. Prerequisite: Senior status and departmental permission.
Prerequisites None
Credits 3



PSY 492: Senior Honors Seminar

Course Description This course is oriented to teaching students how to prepare a thesis, helping them to decide on a research topic by discussing issues with the seminar coordinator and visiting faculty, finding a mentor, preparing the outline of the project, presenting their ideas orally and in writing to peers and the seminar coordinator, and writing the literature review for their proposal. It is intended to produce the first part of the Senior Honors Project.
Prerequisites 21 credits of psychology, including PSY 301
Credits 3



PSY 493: Advanced Topics in Psychology

Course Description Senior status or department permission. With department permission, may be taken more than once on different topics.
Prerequisites None
Credits 3



PSY 494 : Senior Honors Project in Psychology

Course Description Independent research study including literature review, protocol, methods and implementation, statistical analysis, results and discussion, supervised by a Touro faculty member or appropriate substitute.
Prerequisites PSY 492
Credits 3



SAS 103: Introduction to Sociology

Course Description The unique perspectives and methods of social science for understanding the social realities of everyday life; the concept of culture, socialization, social perception and cognition; semiotics and anthropological linguistics; the sociology of knowledge, social ethics and norms; groups and stratification, culture continuity and change; human ecology.
Prerequisites None
Credits 3